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Grinding Grain

In the end, we purchased the grain mill. It arrived by UPS, the driver asking me to raise the garage door so he could ease the box off the back of the truck onto the garage floor instead of having to hump it up the porch stairs. The mill was larger than I expected, made of cast iron and painted forest green, and it weighed as much as a VW bug. It cost as much as one, too, at least as much at the rusted out ...

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Don’t Get Hooked by the Obamacare Debate

So, Congress is locked up again around health care. Large portions of the Affordable Health Care for America Act are set to go into effect in the next few months, and many Republicans aren’t standing for it. Threats of a government shutdown are being made. Texas Republican Senator Ted Cruz is currently speaking on the Senate floor in a quasi-filibuster attempt to derail the legislation. And all of this is g ...

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Support Buddhist Global Relief’s Efforts to Feed the Hungry

In 2007 the American Buddhist scholar-monk, Ven. Bhikkhu Bodhi, was invited to write an editorial essay for the Buddhist magazine Buddhadharma. In his essay, he called attention to the narrowly inward focus of American Buddhism, which has been pursued to the neglect of the active dimension of Buddhist compassion expressed through programs of social engagement. Several of Ven. Bodhi’s students who read the e ...

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6 Reasons Why Michael Pollan Buddhists and Their Vegetarian/Vegan Adversaries Fail at Food Ethics

My recent post here on race and Buddhism has been quite the hot potato. Now standing at 100 comments, the conversation is at turns rich, depressing, inspiring, and infuriating. Over the past week, the topic of food came up, specifically issues around access, food deserts, and intersections of class and race. For some reason, the first thing that came to my mind was the rural community in Western Pennsylvani ...

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“We Are at a Crossroads in Our Culture:” An Interview with Lakota Activist Troy Amlee

Troy Amlee, also known as White Horse Warrior of the White Horse Riders Warrior Society, is a Lakota activist living in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He is Lakota/Dakota part Santee, Teton, and Hunkpapa from the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, and also half Norweigan. He works on a number of issues surrounding Indian country and beyond, including stopping the Enbridge Pipeline with Idle No More, Language and Cu ...

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Food Stamps and Political Anger: Can Buddhists Be Angry?

In a recent column for the New York Times, Paul Krugman called for readers to “get really angry” at House Republicans for sponsoring a bill that would cut off food stamps for 2,000,000 people. He points out that food “stamps” (now credit cards) are needed more than ever during our jobless recovery. He then reveals that Representative Fincher of Tennessee, an active proponent of the bill, has received millio ...

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Sex, Gender, Power: The Study Guide

Sex. Gender. Power. Get your copy of the third volume of The System Stinks, where we investigate systemic sexual misconduct and paths to liberation from sexism and gender oppression. What you'll find inside: An introduction that grapples with the paradox of gender essentialism, the tricky balance of holding both the form and emptiness of concepts like sex and gender.  Sometimes it seems like identifying a s ...

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Now Available To Members! Second Study Guide for The System Stinks

Here it is: the second installment of our year-long curriculum for Buddhist activists. Take a look inside for: An exclusive practice offering video by Rev. Keiryu Lien Shutt Political cartoons, Cultural Appropriation Bingo, and other helpful supplementary texts Our favorite pieces from April's Turning Wheel Media, with discussion questions to help us dig in more deeply An introduction to the audio recording ...

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Love, Forgiveness, Expropriation: Brazil’s Landless Peasant Movement

A central question for me, as a Buddhist organizing for collective liberation from oppression, capitalism, and needless material suffering, is how to resist and reclaim in a spirit of love.  In a discussion here on Turning Wheel, seth nathanson raised an important point for discussion: I can understand the frustration. It seems like the rich are taking from everyone else, so in order to rectify the injustic ...

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