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Show Us Your Jewels! A Community Art Project

What does refuge look like to those who seek wisdom and liberation in both radical politics and compassionate contemplation? 

Check out our community art project:

Refuge: Show Us Your Jewels

Inspired to share? Show us what refuge looks like to you! Please join our community art project and help us dream up a more radical refuge.

Share your visual or verbal representations of the Three Refuges, also known as the Three Jewels: the Buddha, the Dharma, and the Sangha. Many Buddhists turn to these jewels for refuge, and are in turn protected by them in our practice.

Here’s how to participate:

  1. Take or choose one original photo, or write a haiku/tweet, for each one of the following:
    • the quality of awakening (Buddha)
    • a learning that leads toward liberation (Dharma)
    • beloved community (Sangha)
  2. Send your contributions to jewels@bpf.org by August 31, 2017. If you can, help us practice access support by providing image descriptions!

To get you inspired, here are some sample jewels from BPF staff!

Kate Johnson’s Jewels

Buddha: Also look down
Buddha: Also look down

Image description: Two feet in lace-up shoes stand on square bricks, at the edge of a puddle filled with and surrounded by small red paper hearts.

Dharma: Why stand outside

Image description: A tall paned glass window fills the right side of the picture, surrounded by an exterior wall of mostly yellow bricks with a red brick accent underneath. Inside the window, there are small items on a desk and a triptych of red rectangles which each say “i love you”

Sangha: Ground within groundlessness

Image description: Two brown hands, appearing to be from the same person, grasp each other between the palms and wrists in front of a white cloth. Both wrists have red cords wrapped around them.

Leora Fridman’s Jewels

Buddha:

I look to Twitter
on the way to my coffee
and my morning rage

Dharma:

“Liberation is a process, and I think one of the first important things I had to do is stop believing in my inferiority.” — Rev. angel Kyodo williams

Sangha:

Beloved communion
Power leaves the moment
I leave it all to me

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