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Are Trump Protests A Collective Form of Boundary Setting?

Are Trump Protests A Collective Form of Boundary Setting?

What would it mean to set healthy boundaries against Trump's violent rhetoric? ...

5 Ways Buddhists Can Counter Trump’s Bigotry

5 Ways Buddhists Can Counter Trump’s Bigotry

As Buddhists or spiritual people committed to justice, what can we do about hateful, ultra-conservative, quasi-fascist movements like the rise of Donald Trump? ...

Job Posting: Buddhism and Social Justice

Job Posting: Buddhism and Social Justice

Four-month position for a passionate organizer combining dharma and social justice. ...

In Backward Protests for Peter Liang, Who Are Our People?

In Backward Protests for Peter Liang, Who Are Our People?

For Chinese Americans responding to the conviction of officer Peter Liang, does identity trump ethics? ...

5 Responses to the Awkwardly Titled “New Face of Buddhism”

5 Responses to the Awkwardly Titled “New Face of Buddhism”

Reflections on the pitfalls of a Buddhist makeover. 5 BPFers — Funie Hsu, Kate Johnson, Dedunu Sylvia, Katie Loncke, and The Angry Asian Buddhist himself — respond. ...

“We Do Not Live Single-Issue Lives”: Buddhadharma

“We Do Not Live Single-Issue Lives”: Buddhadharma

Wisdom from revolutionary Grace Lee Boggs: "Real wealth is not the possession of property, but the recognition that our deepest need, as human beings, ...

“We Do Not Live Single-Issue Lives”: Affordable Housing

“We Do Not Live Single-Issue Lives”: Affordable Housing

Can nonviolent direct action help stop gentrification and displacement in its tracks? In one town shaken by a housing crises, a fight to stop luxury condo construction turned into ...

The Influence of Orientalism on US Buddhism

“The mercy of the West has been social revolution; the mercy of the East has been individual insight into the basic self/void.” —Gary Snyder, 1961 In contemplating Gary Snyder’s essay “Buddhist Anarchism” for my previous post on Turning Wheel Media, I came across the above phrase, which stuck out to me like a sore thumb. As an Asian American cultural critic and Buddhist practitioner, I have a finely tuned r ...

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What’s Wrong With Sex? A Buddhist Perspective

Scholar and Zen teacher David Loy looks at historical clues from the Buddha's time to ask: what's up with all this sex-negativity? As Buddhism infiltrates the West, one of the important and interesting points of contention is sexuality. Buddhism in Asia has been largely a cultural force for celibacy (among monastics) and sexual restraint, so how is Western Buddhism adapting to the sexual revolution? Today ma ...

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Revisiting Buddhist Anarchism

I’ve been revisiting Buddhist anarchism lately, the strain of socially engaged Buddhism that some foundational Buddhist Peace Fellowship movers and shakers were associated with in some form. Like any religion, Buddhism's tenets and teachings can be interpreted in many ways, including in the anti-state and anti-capitalist direction. In other posts I have indicated that some interpretations of Buddhism have l ...

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Call For Submissions: Decolonizing Our Sanghas

In the words of Ven. Bhikkhu Bodhi, "Buddhism, with its non-theistic framework, grounds its ethics not on the notion of obedience, but on that of harmony." On the individual level, the teetotaling Fifth Precept of Buddhism, a training to abstain from taking intoxicants, is meant not in a moralizing way, but as a practice to help us avoid unnecessary disturbances and disharmony of the mind. “Intoxicants are ...

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The No-Self of Identity Politics

It's a kind of Buddhist-feminist koan: if the personal is political, and the personal (self) is also illusory, are politics illusory, too? Addressing a recent conference of engaged Buddhists and liberation theologians, professor of theology Dr. Melanie Harris candidly recalled how her encounters with Buddhadharma initially challenged her womanist framework — Black feminism that centers race, class, and gend ...

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Welcome to Sex, Gender, Power Month on TWM

It sounds simple enough: I undertake the training to abstain from sexual misconduct.  We might think we know what the Third Precept on sexual misconduct looks like on an interpersonal level.  But how do we see systemic forms of sexist power and gender oppression affecting our societies on a broad scale? We are excited to take this month, as part of our year-long Buddhist social justice curriculum, The Syste ...

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Ananda Come Home…

I have always been fond of Ananda. Probably fonder of him than I am of the Buddha. I think of the two of them as a kind of Frodo Baggins/ Samwise Gangee buddy team. Frodo may have been the ring bearer, with all of the fame and gravitas that comes with the title, but he couldn’t have done any of it without his trusty Sam. Likewise the Buddha. Gotama may have been the millionth incarnation of greatness but wi ...

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Preview: BPF Interviews the International Network of Engaged Buddhists (VIDEO)

(Full-length video coming soon.) We were honored to receive a recent visit from the Secretariat of the International Network of Engaged Buddhists (INEB), Mr. Somboon Chungprempree.  INEB is a powerhouse umbrella group based in Asia, helping to organize socially engaged Buddhists around human rights, alternative education, women and gender struggles, Buddhist youth empowerment, inter-faith dialogue, environm ...

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The Rootstrikers and Job One: A Buddhist Take On Getting Money Out of Politics

Rootstrikers (rootstrikers.org) recently held a conference in San Francisco that was webcast to a national audience. It was an incredibly well designed event dealing with the corrupting influence of money in politics. What came out most clearly at the conference was that getting money out of politics is Job One (my term) for anyone interested in social or environmental justice. To call it Job One means that ...

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Labor is Entitled to All it Produces

by Joshua Stephens I cut my teeth in as an activist, largely, among anarchists; a milieu in which it's taken as granted that labor is entitled to all it produces. Ironically, it was similarly assumed that all movement labor was volunteer. In other words -- labor had no value, and was thus entitled to nothing. This was true for significant contributions of time, and contributions of significant skill, alike. ...

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