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How We Caused (and perpetuate) the African Homophobia we now Decry

How We Caused (and perpetuate) the African Homophobia we now Decry

How We Caused (and perpetuate) the African Homophobia we now Decry   [divide style="2"] Transcript forthcoming — TWM apologizes for the delay and thanks you for your patience! ...

What Would the Buddha Do?

What Would the Buddha Do?

"David Loy's new blog pulls no punches. Jumping off from the recent IPCC climate disruption report, he engages us deeply with the profound questions of whether and how Buddhadharma ...

What We Ignore Makes Us Ignorant

What We Ignore Makes Us Ignorant

  Storytelling, Movement Building, and the Second Noble Truth By Mushim Ikeda [divide] We were taking an easy family hike in Tilden Park, in the hills above Berkeley, California, a ...

Ouch! Systemic Suffering and the Second Noble Truth

Ouch! Systemic Suffering and the Second Noble Truth

[Editor's Note: If you, like us, are thirsting for more socially grounded perspectives on Dharma, you can help Zenju get her beautiful, boldly peaceful meditation center, Still Bre ...

How We Show Up: Storytelling, Movement Building, and the First Noble Truth

How We Show Up: Storytelling, Movement Building, and the First Noble Truth

For me, there’s an often missing and crucial piece of the puzzle in socially engaged Buddhist dialogues, both in person and especially in online dialogues where we express our view ...

The Dukkha of Loving Others: Homophobia In Africa

The Dukkha of Loving Others: Homophobia In Africa

  The Dukkha of Loving Others: Homophobia in Africa [divide style="2"] Now this, monks, is the Noble Truth of dukkha: … death is dukkha; sorrow, lamentation, pain, grief, and ...

The Suffering of Caste

The Suffering of Caste

Students at Nagaloka/Nagaruna Training Institute, a residential program in Nagpur for young Ambedkarite students from all over India. Photo by Alan Senauke. [divide style="2"] The ...

The Greatest Spiritual Explosion

The great Spanish poet Federico Garcia Lorca once said: "The day that hunger is eradicated from the earth, there will be the greatest spiritual explosion the world has ever known. Humanity cannot imagine the joy that will burst into the world on the day of that great revolution." Although, as a Buddhist, I consider the Buddha’s enlightenment and his “turning the wheel of Dharma” to be the greatest spiritual ...

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First Home Dinner After Retreat

by the time food reaches me, it is caked with the invisible pain of others, saturated with the grim labor of thousands. this accumulated degradation is harder to remove than the wax off an apple, or the gerrymandered genes from a cup of Monsanto rice.   but maybe, somewhere along the line, the food has also been blessed by the whispers and motions of resistance. maybe the diggers of these potatoes are ...

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Second Precept: Dangerous Berry Harvests

Heads up: last week Nathan over at Dangerous Harvests (one of my favorite political Buddhist blogs) wrote a thought-provoking post on what it means to pick berries from unattended bushes that are technically "private property."  His questions resonate deeply with what we at BPF have been wondering about reclaiming stolen land. As Nathan puts it: As a Buddhist, I have vowed to uphold the precept of not steal ...

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From Korea: “Women’s Rights Are A Precondition To Food Sovereignty”

Warning: this is not a post about spirituality, per se.  But I invite all dharma junkies to stick around. And I'll tell you why. In my opinion, in order to be strong, the education of a political Buddhist should involve learning about the political and social situations in parts of the world where the teachings of Buddha have deep roots and living traditions.  This interview with Yoon, Geum-Soon illuminates ...

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Taking Our Traditions and Selling ‘em Back To Us: Food and Cultural Appropriation

A sharp, on-point and often hilarious conversationbetween two Asian-American foodies questioning each other about US cuisine and cultural appropriation.  What does integrity look like for chefs who borrow from culinary traditions outside their ethnic group — in a context of (im)migration, commodification, racism (/white supremacy) , and American nationalism?  Is integrity even possible? I think I’m so disen ...

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Food Stamps, Clothing, Shelter, Medicine: Where We Meet Freedom

My first experience in food justice was delicious.  I scooped it up with a shovel-sized serving spoon from a bottomless platter of intentionally blessed local organic righteousness.  It was fresh bright crunchy green, pale yellow creamy, deep orange sunsets, and vibrant dancing reds.  I was on my first meditation retreat in the Vipassana (Insight Meditation) tradition.   I was eating lovingkindness in every ...

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July Theme: Dharma of Food Justice

Secret-Buddhist food celebrities.* Activism, art, contemplation. Mindfulness and nutritional racism. Poetry that reconnects with roots. Welcome to a new month, friends! Here at Turning Wheel we are excited to embark on an experiment: throughout July we'll be highlighting issues of food justice from Buddhist and spiritual perspectives. Some days we'll feature new submissions; other days we'll blog about nour ...

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Why Guerrilla Theater? A Behind the Scenes Look at “Who Speaks?”

Our recent event “What’s Up With Engaged Buddhism?” started because I was in a total panic. It was January. I had suddenly stepped in as Acting Director of the Buddhist Peace Fellowship while Sarah Weintraub went on temporary disability, trying to get healthy after picking up a number of mysterious illnesses on a fall trip to Colombia to reconnect with her peace work there. I reached out to elders in the BP ...

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Health & Healing for Radical Buddhists

The Buddha woke up to the suffering of the world when faced with old age, sickness, and death. As practitioners, we are encouraged to view our own experiences of illness, aging, and impending death as dharma doors to enlightenment. At the same time, as Buddhist radicals, we know that oppression means these universal sufferings affect each of us differently. Health is intimate, but also systemic: it's imposs ...

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Kumi Yamashita’s Constellation Portraits

Nails and a single black thread. Today, the work of Japanese artist Kumi Yamashita inspired me to stop, breathe, and rededicate myself to the task at hand, full of gratitude for what is possible with patience, dedication, imagination, and grace. Amazing. Thanks to Kenji Liu for introducing me to Yamashita's work. (What she does with light and shadows is also incredible.) While I don't know whether she is Bu ...

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