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A New Story of Us: Storytelling, Movement Building & the 4th Noble Truth

A New Story of Us: Storytelling, Movement Building & the 4th Noble Truth

Stories matter. Many stories matter. Stories have been used to dispossess and to malign, but stories can also be used to empower and to humanize. Stories can break the dignity of a ...

A Song to Stop Urban Shield

A Song to Stop Urban Shield

The 1999 WTO protests in Seattle marked the beginning of what has become a rapid militarization of U.S. police departments all across the country. BPFers in the Bay Area decided to ...

When You Picture U.S. Buddhists, Do You Think Of Me?

When You Picture U.S. Buddhists, Do You Think Of Me?

Re-visibilizing Asian Americans in Buddhism is a precious opportunity. It can mean opening up, anchoring in hard historical truths, and bearing witness to an array of stories, voic ...

Fuck Your Right Speech (Are You Listening?)

Fuck Your Right Speech (Are You Listening?)

Is Right Speech rigged to support the status quo? ...

Buddhists and the Bloc: An Open Thread On Antifa

Buddhists and the Bloc: An Open Thread On Antifa

Buddhists disagree over black bloc tactics and antifa orientations. What's your take? ...

Urgent Prayers for Charlottesville, Virginia

Urgent Prayers for Charlottesville, Virginia

As extreme right-wing groups, encouraged to arrive armed, prepare to converge in Charlottesville, Virginia tomorrow, we at Buddhist Peace Fellowship want to Be in spiritual and mat ...

Emergency Teach-In AUGUST 17: Buddhists Wage Peace in Korea

Emergency Teach-In AUGUST 17: Buddhists Wage Peace in Korea

You might have heard Trump’s “fire and fury” dick-swinging toward North Korea, risking nuclear escalation. Did you also know that Won Buddhists are playing a major role for peace o ...

Media Reviews from Winter 2010

That Bird Has My Wings: The Autobiography of an Innocent Man on Death Row by Jarvis Jay Masters Harper One, 2009, 304 pages, $14.99, paperback Reviewed by Hozan Alan Senauke Jarvis Masters lives on San Quentin’s East Block, home to nearly 500 of the nearly 700 men on California’s Death Row. It was in the solitary confinement of San Quentin’s Adjustment Center that he became a practicing Buddhist. And it was ...

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Making the “Enemy” Human:

I first discovered Kristine Huskey when I read her book, Justice at Guantánamo: One Woman’s Odyssey and Her Crusade for Human Rights. It spoke to me for a number of reasons. Rather than simply offering an analysis of the human rights issues pertaining to the treatment of detainees at Guantánamo, Huskey offers a woman’s perspective on what it’s like to be there. Her story also spoke to me because she is a wo ...

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Mustard Seeds in Afghanistan

  Last autumn, in the weeks leading up to President Obama’s decision to send more troops to Afghanistan, two courageous Afghani women were touring the United States trying to educate American citizens about what is happening in their country. In October, Zoya, a member of the Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan (RAWA), gave a speech in San Francisco. Two weeks later, in early November ...

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The Long Road from Rangoon

The drone of early morning crickets drowns out the sound of my footsteps as I walk through the doors of the Pagoda View Hotel, the dirt drive damp from the heavy Rangoon mists, the sun hefting itself wearily above the horizon. Mo Win stands off to the side of the driveway; I can barely make him out in the shadow of two tall trees. U Thein Ya waits with the engine of his taxi turned off. He flashes on the he ...

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Of Buddhas and Samaritans…

I’ve long felt that the spiritual calling is not really so different from one religion to the next. At their core, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Paganism, Native American traditions, all of them are looking at things that are as mysterious as looking up into the sky at night, all those stars, all that infinity… and looking for a response. But back here on earth, the question is a little ...

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The Story Is The Seed:

We’re putting you to work in the front office,” the woman said to me on my second or third day at Green Gulch Farm as a practice apprentice, a beautiful day in August of 2008. For well over a year, I had plotted and planned how I was going to leave my desk job at a luxury watch company to move to Green Gulch and become a residential Zen student. I was so certain that I had changed my life, I couldn’t fully ...

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